Trapped in the house with the wife and two dogs during this recent winter storm, I watched the twelve inches of snow blow across the yard into three foot high drifts. I even took a few pictures and posted them to Picasa, you can peruse them at your leisure here (http://bit.ly/K2xQQx).
What does this have to do with geography and GIS you ask? Glad you did, or were going to, or have been led to believe. The same processes that created the snow dunes and keep me from escaping, I mean, taking my wife out, I mean to the store, are the same processes that create the dunes we see in deserts and arid climates. In fact, the area around central Indiana was also created by the same eolian (wind driven) process as created the drifts in my yard. As the glaciers retreated from this area over 12,000 years ago, they left behind all the sediment they had scraped up along the way. The very lightest particles, the silts and clays, were then blown by the wind across the region, creating dunes which were covered with vegetation so that and all that is left behind are the gentle undulations and rolling countryside. So that is why snow dunes are worthy of a geography post. Now if you will excuse me, I hear the snow shovel calling my name again.

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